"There is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things."

~ Niccolo Machiavelli, historian and writer

Monday, October 19, 2015

CanuckKabuk Law

As I've noted before, although all kinds of links to all kinds of interesting information be found in the  sidebar, I have never had an official  blogroll at A Primer on Special Needs and the Law - the main reason being that there are very few Canadian legal-disability blogs out there, or at least very few that I'm aware of.

But today I came across "Kabuk Law" (no, I have absolutely no clue where that name came from although I can tell you that they bill themselves as "the first interactive platform for seeking legal advice in North America, enabling consumers to source desired providers and book appointments online" and there is an interesting little story behind how the site came to be) that appears worthy of sharing.

This is the link to their blog, where some interesting articles in their own right can be found. This will take you to their main page.

So what's it all about, you ask?

Basically it's a CANADIAN site that attempts to connect the public (meaning people like you. And you. And yes, you too) with lawyers. Pardon my excitement, but finding truly Canadian sites like this is indeed rare.

So check them out. Even if you're not in need of legal services at the moment, it's never hurts to be a Boy Girl Scout and be prepared. Check out their blog, too; as I said, there looks to be some very interesting stuff there, including a link to a survey asking people about their experiences looking for legal advice or (gasp) even an actual lawyer.

It would appear that they actually want to make getting legal advice easier, right here in Canada. Who would have thunk it, eh?

Sunday, October 18, 2015

Disabling Poverty, Enabling Citizenship – Canada's Federal Parties Have Their Say

We all know we should need to vote, but sometimes we wonder why we bother. And yet if the democratic process can be this frustrating to typical Canadians, it is often all the more so when it comes to individuals with disabilities and their family members, particularly since it so often seems that most of the issues that more important to us are not even on any government radar.

Operating on the theory that knowledge is power, I am passing along a Media Release from the Canadian Council on Disabilities that came to my attention today. I realize it's getting a little close to the line to question your Parliamentary Hopefuls, but if you want to know where the different political parties stand on issues of particular relevance to the disability community, read on.
The Council of Canadians with Disabilities (CCD) a national organization working for an inclusive and accessible Canada, sought commitments from Canada's major political parties on initiatives focused on disabling poverty and enabling citizenship.
  • Poverty alleviation (CCD identified a refundable Disability Tax Credit as a first step) and increased employment opportunities; 
  • Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and ratification of its Optional Protocol, and;
  •  Accessibility measures (such as a Canadians with Disabilities Act, enforceable access regulations for transportation and other areas in Federal jurisdiction, improved palliative care and other services, support for capacity building for the
    disability community)